A-Okay Intersectionality: A visibility report on autistic aces & their experiences

Happy Autism Acceptance Month! In celebration, we created this infographic to inform and share our data with you all. With one third of surveyed aces being on the autism spectrum we would like to spotlight the intersectionality experienced by autistic aces. This data comes for the 2019 Ace Community Survey data which will be in a report later this year, so be on the lookout! For more information on Autism Acceptance Month and autistic experiences please visit the Autism Society.

infographic on autistic aces

Bi Visibility Day report: “Putting the B in A”

Here at the Ace Community Survey team, intersectionality is an essential part of our identities as it is for those in the broader ace community. This Bi Visibility Day, we have released a visibility report to challenge biphobia and increase bi awareness using data taken from the 2019 Ace Community Survey. Please enjoy and share this infographic to spread awareness of where the bi and ace communities overlap. For more information about Bi Visibility Day which is celebrated every September 23rd, feel free to visit https://bivisibilityday.com/

Bi Visibility Day infographic

Click for the full size!

Special thanks goes out to Lea for data analysis and quality control, and Robin for quality control.

The Aromantic Spectrum in the Ace Community Survey

by René Mellema & Tristan Miller

Recently, there has been a lot of discussion about the interaction between the asexual and aromantic communities.  Following our review of extant aro community surveys, we contribute to the discussion by reviewing the information we have about aromantic and aromantic-spectrum respondents to the 2017 Ace Community Survey.

Main Findings

Although our survey recruits from asexual communities rather than aromantic communities, we are able to gather information about people on the aromantic spectrum, including some allosexual people. Some of our important findings are as follows:

  1. Compared to aro community surveys, our survey finds a larger number of gray-(a)romantic, demiromantic, lithromantic, and quoiromantic people as compared to aromantic people.
  2. Among our respondents, people on the aromantic spectrum were more likely to be non-binary.  Allosexual people (regardless of romantic orientation) were more likely to be men.
  3. People on the aromantic spectrum, especially those who were also on the asexual spectrum, were less likely to have had romantic relationships.  Allosexual people on the aromantic spectrum were more likely to have non-romantic significant relationships, and to be polyamorous.
  4. Both the asexual or aromantic spectrums are negatively correlated with sexual activity.
  5. On average, allosexual people have a higher sex drive, and higher frequency of sexual fantasies, masturbation, and porn consumption, regardless of romantic orientation.

Further details are below. Continue reading

Transgender and assigned sex

Question:  How many people in the ace community are transgender, and how many are a different gender from the one assigned at birth?

“Transgender” is sometimes defined as having a gender which is distinct from the sex assigned at birth (SAAB). However, this definition fails on a large scale, particularly among people who neither identify as women nor men (non-binary people).  We already know from previous surveys that the ace community is dominated by women and non-binary people.  What remains is an analysis of SAAB and trans identity.

Continue reading

Sexuality and Sexual politics

Question: How is one’s sexuality related to one’s sexual politics?

Asexuality refers to personal experiences, and not whether they think there’s too much sex in society.  But unsurprisingly, personal experiences and attitudes can be correlated.  Here we seek to identify which aspects of sexuality are correlated with political attitudes, and explore those connections. Continue reading

Cross-orientations among non-aces

Question: Are non-asexual respondents identifying with mismatching sexual and romantic orientation labels?

The asexual community has long recognized the possibility of any combination of romantic and sexual orientations, such as heteroromantic asexual or biromantic homosexual.  And in recent years, there’s been a push for the aromantic spectrum to be recognized independently from the asexual spectrum.  We’d like to estimate the number of non-aces who have applied these ideas to themselves. Continue reading